The financial crisis and the systemic failure of academic economics

10/06/2009

"The global financial crisis has revealed the need to rethink fundamentally how financial systems are regulated. It has also made clear a systemic failure of the economics profession. Over the past three decades, economists have largely developed and come to rely on models that disregard key factors—including heterogeneity of decision rules, revisions of forecasting strategies, and changes in the social context—that drive outcomes in asset and other markets. It is obvious, even to the casual observer that these models fail to account for the actual evolution of the real-world economy. Moreover, the current academic agenda has largely crowded out research on the inherent causes of financial crises. There has also been little exploration of early indicators of system crisis and potential ways to prevent this malady from developing. In fact, if one browses through the academic macroeconomics and finance literature, “systemic crisis” appears like an otherworldly event that is absent from economic models. Most models, by design, offer no immediate handle on how to think about or deal with this recurring phenomenon". Thus goes the introduction to a paper entitled The financial crisis and the systemic failure of academic economics. This group paper was the outcome of discussions held during the 98th Dahlem Workshop, 2008. Incidentally, the link comes courtesy of the Canadian Progressive Economics Forum blog.

Posted in: EconomicsEconomics

Tagged with: Political Economyeconomists

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